The new recession is arriving?

October 2020 Forums General discussion The new recession is arriving?

Viewing 15 posts - 136 through 150 (of 184 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #198205
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    This economic crisis was overdue already, and we have not recovered from the 2008/2009 yet

    #198309
    alanjjohnstone
    Participant

    Why the stock market’s ‘very strange’ reaction to the latest news may be as ‘insane’ as it looks

    In recent days and weeks, stock prices have been improving dramatically — even though the health and economic crisis on the ground seems far from over.

    “In the face of some of the worst economic numbers in American history,” White and Rasayam explain, “cratering energy prices and a freshly dysfunctional Congress, investors are sending stock prices higher. To many, this may seem insane. And it quite possibly is insane.”

    There is a general belief that the efforts by Congress to flood the economy with cash will help ensure that, once the doors finally open again, there will be a massive surge in rehiring and a rapid snapback in economic growth.

    Investors seemed to react joyfully to the Fed’s announcement that it “would pump more than $2 trillion in loans to businesses of all sizes, as well as buy up the bonds of troubled city and state governments along with riskier corporate debt,”

    #198312
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    It is all fictitious capital. During 1930 there was a drastic increase in the stock market, and later on, everything went down, capitalism is a very unstable system. Some economists have indicated that the so-called stimulus package is not enough, so are talking about 20 trillion. The obvious thing is that all that money is going to be stolen by the capitalist barons

    #198586
    alanjjohnstone
    Participant

    https://www.bbc.com/news/business-52267117

    South Asia faces its worst economic performance in 40 years because of the coronavirus, the World Bank has said.

    “South Asia finds itself in a perfect storm of adverse effects. Tourism has dried up, supply chains have been disrupted, demand for garments has collapsed and consumer and investor sentiments have deteriorated,”

    #198587
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Now they are blaming everything on the Coronavirus, but they  do not blame on the logical laws of capitalism

    #198961
    alanjjohnstone
    Participant

    Richard Wolff on the recession

    COVID-19 Was a Trigger, But Capitalism Caused the Economic Crash

    Despite his Marxist credentials where he rightly draws attention to the already instability of the economy before COVID-19, he then props up Sanders FDR policies

    #199179
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Historic day for oil markets as WTI crude crashes below zero for first time

    Crude oil price drops to almost zero value, or below zero value

     

    #199182
    Anonymous
    Inactive
    #199221
    Ozymandias
    Participant

    Will. There be a run on the banks soon? Hyper Inflation?

    #199369
    Anonymous
    Inactive
    #199371
    alanjjohnstone
    Participant

    https://uk.reuters.com/article/uk-health-coronavirus-oil-bears-analysis/oil-giveaway-brings-out-the-bears-idUKKCN22325W

    “This is part of the deflation process,” said Murray Gunn, head of global research at market forecasting firm Elliott Wave International.  “At this juncture, our analysis suggests that this is very probably the second wave of a much bigger fall…over the next two or three years we will be in a deflationary environment. Survival will be paramount. And cash is king.”

    “What we’re seeing here is this fast-forward recession,” said Patrick Perret-Green, head of research at AdMacro. “Then the question is do they then start re-evaluating other things? So, all commodities trading, copper, the whole shebang…we’re reading the fundamental collapse as something not just for oil but for everything.”

    U.S shale producers who depend on U.S. crude futures in the low $40s per barrel to break even, are deleterious and could weigh on growth if their usually huge capex spending vanishes.

    “At these prices, the entire industry is underwater,” said David Winans, a credit analyst at global money manager PGIM.

    “The math is pretty simple. Current oil production is about 90 million barrels per day, but demand is only 75 million barrels per day,” said Gregory Leo, chief investment officer and head of global wealth management at IDB Bank.

    #199540
    alanjjohnstone
    Participant

    The effective tax rate for the wealthiest 10% of the population – once income and wealth were combined – was 18%, less than half the 42% effective tax rate for the bottom 10%.

    The government has the potential to raise up to £174bn a year to help cope with the Covid-19 crisis if it taxed wealth at the same rate as income, a UK tax expert has said.

    Richard Murphy, a professor in political economy at City University in London, said income was being taxed at almost 10 times the rate of wealth – and that the disparity should be central to any debate about who should pay for the pandemic.

    In an analysis of the period from 2011 to 2018, Murphy said income had been taxed on average at 29.4% while wealth – generated mostly from rising house prices and the increased value of personal pensions – had been taxed at 3.4%.

    Britain’s overall tax system highly regressive because the gains from rising wealth tended to be concentrated among the better off while council tax, VAT, the BBC licence fee and duties on alcohol and tobacco took up a bigger slice of the incomes of the poorest households.

    https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2020/apr/22/wealth-tax-rise-could-raise-174bn-tackle-covid-19-expert-says

    #199989
    alanjjohnstone
    Participant

    Not perhaps hyper-inflation, Ozy, but according to some, definitely higher inflation

    https://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/opinion/global-financial-crisis-20-coming-wallet-200423132344298.html

    “Tim Congdon, chairman of the Institute of International Monetary Research (IIMR) at the University of Buckingham, warns: “The policy response to the coronavirus pandemic will be followed by an inflationary boom.” Specifically, he foresees a British inflation rate “closer to 10 percent than we have seen for many years”. The most recent figure for UK inflation is from March, when it was 1.5 percent.”

    #199999
    Anonymous
    Inactive

    Inflation is produced by the over-issuance of money

    #200093
    Ozymandias
    Participant

    Thanks for that Alan.

Viewing 15 posts - 136 through 150 (of 184 total)
  • You must be logged in to reply to this topic.