Japan

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  • #248327
    Thomas_More
    Participant

    #248356
    Thomas_More
    Participant

    Please read my comments in the comments section of this video, and please add your own in response to his half-understanding.

    #248492
    Thomas_More
    Participant

    #248814
    Thomas_More
    Participant

    https://mainichi.jp/english/articles/20220219/p2a/00m/0na/029000c

    Death penalty.

    • This reply was modified 2 months, 3 weeks ago by Thomas_More.
    #248836
    Thomas_More
    Participant
    #248960
    Thomas_More
    Participant
    #249323
    Thomas_More
    Participant

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kanno_Sugako

    Meiji was savage to socialists and anarchists and to any working class activism.

    #249339
    Thomas_More
    Participant

    The real contempt of governments for their working class subjects is often made evident, and Okinawa is a prime example.
    Indoctrinated with nationalism, the Okinawans met American gunfire fanatically with bamboo spears – little knowing that Tokyo was planning to unleash plague on them, which would then spread to the Americans too.

    #249431
    Thomas_More
    Participant

    scroll.in:

    ” In 2003, Tokyo passed a regulation that required school or board officials to record the names of teachers who did not stand and sing the national anthem. The anthem, Kimigayo, is a solemn song about Japan’s emperor.”

    #249433
    Thomas_More
    Participant

    Wikipedia:

    ” In 1999, several teachers in Hiroshima refused to put up the anthem while the Hiroshima Education Board demanded that they do so. As the tension arose between them, a vice-principal killed himself. A similar incident in Osaka in 2010 also occurred, with 32 teachers refusing to sing the song in a ceremony. In 2011, nine more teachers joined the rebellion, along with another eight in 2012.[48] Hashimoto Toru, the mayor of Osaka, stated that “t was good that criminals who are intent on breaking the rules have risen to the surface”.[49] Some have protested that such rules violate the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the “freedom of thought, belief and conscience” clause in the Constitution of Japan,[50] but the Board has argued that since schools are government agencies, their employees have an obligation to teach their students how to be good Japanese citizens. Teachers have unsuccessfully brought criminal complaints against Governor of Tokyo Shintarō Ishihara and senior officials for ordering teachers to honour the Hinomaru and “Kimigayo”.[51] After earlier opposition, the Japan Teachers Union accepts the use of both the flag and national anthem; the smaller All Japan Teachers and Staffs Union still opposes both symbols and their use inside the school system.[52]

    In 2006, Katsuhisa Fujita, a retired teacher in Tokyo, was threatened with imprisonment and fined 200,000 yen (roughly 2,000 US dollars) after he was accused of disturbing a graduation ceremony at Itabashi Senior High School by urging the attendees to remain seated during the playing of the national anthem.[53] At the time of Fujita’s sentence, 345 teachers had been punished for refusing to take part in anthem related events, though Fujita is the only man to have been convicted in relation to it.[54] On 21 September 2006, the Tokyo District Court ordered the Tokyo Metropolitan Government to pay compensation to the teachers who had been subjected to punishment under the directive of the Tokyo Board of Education. The then Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi commented, “It is a natural idea to treat the national anthem importantly”. The ruling was appealed by the Metropolitan Government.[55] From 23 October 2003 to 2008, 410 teachers and school workers were punished for refusing to stand and sing the anthem as ordered by school principals.[56] Teachers can also be punished if their students do not stand while “Kimigayo” is played during school ceremonies.[50]

    On 30 May 2011 and 6 June 2011, two panels of the Supreme Court of Japan ruled that it was constitutional to require teachers to stand in front of the Hinomaru and sing the Kimigayo during school ceremonies. In making the ruling, the panels ratified the decision of the Tokyo High Court in ruling against 13 teachers who had asked for court relief after being disciplined between 2003 and 2005 for refusing to stand and sing the anthem.[57]

    Outside of the school system, there was a controversy regarding “Kimigayo” soon after the passage of the 1999 law. A month after the law’s passage, a record containing a performance of “Kimigayo” by Japanese rock musician Kiyoshiro Imawano was removed by Polydor Records from his album Fuyu no Jujika (冬の十字架, cross in winter). Polydor did not want to attract harassment from far-right groups. In response, Imawano re-released the album through an independent label with the track in question.”

    #249435
    Thomas_More
    Participant
    #250418
    Thomas_More
    Participant
    #250422
    Almamater
    Participant

    Japan is the same case of Detroit and Chicago, there was a popular saying that said: If you see a man sleeping in the subway, he is a worker of the automotive industry, workers had to work long hours under heavy stress in the assembly line, and there was a high rate of divorce among them and families were falling apart

    Many died at the assembly line due to illness, exhaustion, hypertension and heart diseases, ( if you do not come on Sunday do not come on Monday ) ironically, the so called socialist nation of the Soviet Union also adopted Ford assembly line, to produce high profits for the socialist homeland. There was not difference

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