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Pamphlets

Socialism and Religion

INTRODUCTION by Adam Buick

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This pamphlet was first published by the Socialist Party of Great Britain in London in 1910. It proved so popular that a new edition was brought out the following year. This was not surprising in that the pamphlet is well-written and well-argued but also because, at that time and for half-a-century afterwards, the main outlet for putting across the case for socialism was the outdoor platform.

It was here that new contacts were made and socialist pamphlets and journals sold. But who else was to be found speaking on the same street corners and in the same parks but open-air preachers urging workers to “Come to Jesus”? In other words, explaining and refuting religion wasn’t just a philosophical exercise; it was a practical necessity.

Date: 
1910

From Handicraft to Capitalism (by Karl Kautsky, 1906)

From Handicraft to Capitalism (by Karl Kautsky, 1906)

S.P.G.B. Library No. 2.

Translated from the German by H. J. Neumann for The Socialist Party of Great Britain and approved by the Author.

 

FOREWORD

By the courtesy of our Comrade Karl Kautsky—to whom we are indebted, not only for his readily accorded permission to reproduce in English, but also for his personal correction of the proofs of our translation— we are able to publish as our second contribution to the Socialist library which we are anxious to build up, the first section of Kautsky's famous book, Das Erfurter Programme, a section which has already appeared through the columns of the Party Organ, The Socialist Standard.

Date: 
1906

Manifesto of The Socialist Party of Great Britain (June 12th 1905)

Fellow Members of the Working-Class,

In bringing to your notice the aims and methods of The Socialist Party of Great Britain, and in order that the reason for the existence of the Party may be clearly understood, it will be necessary to give a short survey of the position of our class under existing society, and a sketch of the historical development which has resulted in present conditions.

Date: 
1905