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Pamphlets

Is a Third World War Inevitable?

Is a Third World War Inevitable?

Introduction
Each day it becomes more obvious that mankind must choose between the security of a peaceful society, which only conscious action can bring about, and the insecurity of militarism which is an inherent part of today's society, the 'civilisation' of the bomb and the dole queue.

There are many responses to the threat of war, from the' Apocalypse Now' hysteria of those who allow emotion to overcome reason, to the view expressed by a politician like Mrs Thatcher who, when opening Britain's most advanced torpedo factory , said that such weapons of destruction would serve to defend 'the British way of life' (Guardian, 11 April 1981). Those who would have us march round in circles pleading with leaders to 'ban the bomb' and those who urge us to sit back in our armchairs and have faith in the wisdom of governments have in common an ignorance of the cause of war and social insecurity.

Date: 
1982

Trade Unions

Foreword

This pamphlet is directed to all workers-unionists and non-unionists alike. Membership of a trade union does not determine whether or not you are a member of the working class. Workers are an economic unit, because they work for a wage or salary. They are compelled to sell their mental and physical energies and in the process are exploited, inasmuch that they produce a greater amount of wealth than they receive. Our analysis of trade unions, and the position of the workers in the capitalist system, is based upon this theory which is dealt with in detail in Chapter Eight.

Date: 
1980

Marxian Economics

Preface

The Marxian analysis of society and its development - historical, economic, political - will not die, nor go away, nor even lie down. Today, over a hundred years after the publication of the first volume of Capital, the interest in the ideas of Karl Marx is wider than ever.

There can be no reason for this, other than that the Marxian analysis is still relevant. It alone provides a consistent, comprehensive and applicable picture of the origins and development of capitalism and of how it must be replaced by Socialism.

Date: 
1978

Questions of the Day

Foreword

A pamphlet with the same title was first published in 1932. In addition to reprints, new editions were issued in 1942, 1953 and 1969, some sections in the earlier editions being omitted and new ones added as fresh issues presented themselves. Four new sections have been added to this edition.

The purpose of the pamphlet is to give in handy form statements of the attitude of the Socialist Party of Great Britain towards important problems and happenings about which questions are put to us. It includes a section on the founding of the Socialist Party of Great Britain in order to show what were the reasons that led the founder-members to draw up the DECLARATION OF PRINCIPLES (see below) that has remained unaltered as the basis of the Party, and of our Companion Parties in other countries.

Date: 
1978

Socialist Principles Explained (1975 version)

Object and Declaration of Principles

Preface

The basis of the Socialist Party of Great Britain (and of its Companion Parties in other countries) is the OBJECT and DECLARATION of PRINCIPLES: applicants for membership are required to indicate their acceptance of them. It is more than a formal declaration and applicants must show that they understand the implications of what they sign.

The purpose of this pamphlet is to provide in convenient form a brief and simple introduction to the OBJECT and each of the eight Clauses, though we would emphasise that the Declaration has to be considered as a whole. The reader of the pamphlet will notice a certain amount of repetition in the different sections. It was considered desirable to repeat some statements wherever appropriate in order to make the position quite clear.

Date: 
1975

Historical Materialism

Preface

Most people know that in past centuries the world was very different from what it is now – different methods of production and means of transport, different ideas and behaviour, different political systems, and different social classes – slave owners and slaves, feudal lords and serfs, and now employers and wage earners.

What is less well known is what caused these changes and how they were brought about. It is the purpose of this pamphlet to refute the explanations offered by writers who have attributed the changes to divine guidance, or to the independent development of ideas, or to the role played by “Great Men”, and to show what really happened.

Date: 
1975

The Socialist Party and War

Preface

We published a pamphlet War and the Working Class in 1936 and a more detailed study in 1950, with the title The Socialist Party and War. Both are now out of print. The present publication is a revised edition dealing with more recent events and developments.

Since the formation of the Socialist Party of Great Britain in 1904 many changes have taken place. Armaments have become more costly and vastly more destructive. Old empires have shrunk and been replaced by new ones and new nations have been formed, all prepared to wage war. Two world wars led to the creation of, first, the League of Nations and then the United Nations, both supposed to be dedicated to the preservation of peace, and there have been scores of disarmament conferences and anti-war campaigns, all of them utterly futile as a means of preventing war. Smaller wars have continued and a third world war is an ever present threat.

Date: 
1970

Labour Government or Socialism?

Foreword

This pamphlet tells you what socialists think of Labour government - not only the Wilson government which entered office in 1964 but all Labour governments past, present and future.

Date: 
1968

Russia 1917-1967 A Socialist Analysis

Preface

In 1948 we published a pamphlet ‘Russia Since 1917: Socialist Views of Bolshevik Policy’, consisting of a reprint of articles from our journal THE SOCIALIST STANDARD during the years 1915-48. The following note appeared in the Preface:

“In the articles themselves, no attempt has been made to interfere with the original text. The articles stand just as they are written. We have nothing to fear from letting our original words stand. There are, it is true, passages in some of the earlier articles which, were we writing them today in the light of information now available, we would phrase differently; but these are points of  detail. In essentials, the articles stand as overwhelmingly testimony to the soundness of the Marxist position – the position of the Socialist Party of Great Britain.”

Date: 
1967

The Case for Socialism

PREFACE

It may well happen that the contents of this pamphlet will not be at all what some readers anticipate from the title. The word 'Socialism' is widely used in so loose and inaccurate a way that they may expect to find in 'The Case for Socialism' arguments about the supposed merits of the nationalised industries or about electing a Labour Government. No such arguments will be found in this pamphlet or in any of the propaganda of the Socialist Party of Great Britain and its Companion Parties in other countries. Instead, the reader is asked to consider the case for replacing the social system that exists here and in all countries of the world by a fundamentally different social system.

Date: 
1962

* The Capitalist * The Worker * The Class Struggle * Wages * Depression * Politics

Preface

Wage and salary earners have endless problems to worry about - problems of wages and prices, rents and mortgages, and how to provide against sickness, unemployment and old age. The usual attitude is to regard these problems as ones that can be dealt with by the trade unions or by new Acts of Parliament, and at each General Election the Labour, Liberal and Tory Parties tell the voters about the new laws they will introduce if they become the Government.

Date: 
1962

Art, Labour and Socialism

Art, Labour & Socialism by William Morris

With a Modern Assessment

Foreword

An address that William Morris delivered at University College, Oxford, was reprinted by him in the magazine Today, in February 1884, under the title “Art Under Plutocracy”.

In 1907 the larger part of it was published by the Socialist Party of Great Britain in pamphlet form as Art, Labour and Socialism.

It has long been out of print and we are issuing it again because, in the words of our Foreword to our original edition:

“It is not often that an accepted master in the arts can express himself with lucid brevity in the language of the common people; and even less frequently is that master able to scientifically diagnose the conditions of his own craft”.

Date: 
1962

Schools Today

The Socialist view of a prominent current question

Introduction

It can confidently be said that in recent years education has been more often and more widely discussed than at any time since the public education system began. There is the perennial question of the “eleven-plus” and the clamour for “equality of opportunity”; there are the recurrent alarms about illiteracy, delinquency and blackboard jungles. At the same time, springing up in every city are the great glass- walled hives which are the new schools of the nineteen-fifties, visible symbols of changes which have taken and are taking place.

Date: 
1959

Socialist Comment

This pamphlet consists of a selection of articles that appeared in the Socialist Standard during 1955 and 1956. They have been published because they deal with issues of current interest and give the Socialist Party’s attitude to them in a handy form.

 

CONTENTS

1. The Rich Still Own the Country

2. Are You Satisfied with Your Pay?

3. Planless Booms and Runaway Slumps

4. Housing, Planning and Modern Life

5. Class and Colour in South Africa

6. Why Socialists Oppose the Labour Party

7. The Materialist Conception of History

 

THE RICH STILL OWN THE COUNTRY

LABOUR SPOKESMEN ADMIT OUR CHARGE

Date: 
1956

Russia Since 1917

P R E F A C E

This pamphlet consists of articles published originally on the Socialist Standard. It is a record, in collected form, of the attitude of the Socialist Party of Great Britain to events in Russia since 1917. In March of that year the Czarist regime collapsed and was followed, after short-lived stop-gap Ministry, by the Kerensky Government which was a coalition of various reformist parties. This Government was opposed by the Bolsheviks who, under the leadership of Lenin and Trotsky, overthrew it and seized power in October, 1917.

Date: 
1948