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T. A. Jackson

T. A. Jackson

When early in the year the Executive Committee of the Socialist Party of Great Britain received from T. A. Jackson a deeply significant letter of resignation, neither resentment nor anxiety arose in the breasts of those who heard the pitiful epistle. Knowing the man's particularly bad circumstances, generous sympathy and pity came uppermost. Hoping that he might pass into oblivion without prejudice to the working class and Socialism we contemplated no action against him. This was not to be, however : Jackson has taken the pay and has to pipe the tune called—to wit, the mal-education and betrayal of the working class. So much to show that in publishing this exposure we are not animated by stupid feelings of spite, resentment or revenge.

We make no excuse for using every weapon to hand : as between feelings of old comradeship or the conventions upon the one hand and the well-being of the working class on the other, the Socialist can but choose the latter.

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