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Strike-breaking

A Housewife Reflects

 At 9.15 p.m. on Saturday, 2nd Sept., Mr. Attlee broadcast a reply to criticisms of the Government by the Leader of the opposition a week previously. His speech, delivered quietly and with none of the dramatic rhetoric which characterises his vis-a-vis, caused quite a flutter. A certain acid wit ridiculed his opponent and was much more devastating than the usual passionate utterances of the “Ex Prime.” One could imagine the “True Blues” gnashing their teeth, their temperatures hitting a new high as each caustic jibe floated over the air. The supporters of the Labour Government chortling with glee and swelling with pride in their “Leader.”

A Strike is Fun to Some People

 How the children of the favoured section of society view the bitter struggles the workers wage for improved conditions is illustrated by the following extract. It is taken from Scott’s “Gino Watkins.” Watkins was the fearless Polar explorer who was drowned, while still under thirty, when exploring alone off Iceland in a canoe.

The General Strike referred to was in 1926.

      “He went back to Cambridge for what promised to be a busy summer term. . . . But now another interest came to distract him—the wild rumours and real disturbances in England which culminated in the General Strike. Gino’s delight in the experiences that it brought him was an example of the spirit in which the Prime Minister’s appeal to carry on as if nothing serious had happened was so naturally and successfully obeyed.

The Workers Under "Labour Rule."

 Lessons from Australia

Rise and Fall of a Pitboy

  A great future was once forecast for Michael Eaton, not least by himself. He might have made it to the top, to become a recognisable man of power and influence. Instead he is someone dominated by a feeling of “gloom and failure", of no longer being in charge of his life. Once he was a firm supporter of the professed free market principles of the Thatcher governments. a disciple of the creed that hard work, ingenuity and experience were enough to build a fortune. Now he complains bitterly about the government which undermined him. with policies which brought the recession and his own failure and which, he says, could and should have been changed a long time ago.

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