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The Second International

The Socialist Party and the Second International pt.3

    Last month we described the growing realisation amongst members of the Socialist Party of Great Britain that even the leading figures on the intransigent wing of international social democracy were tainted with reformism. This month we describe how our party, long before Lenin, came to see the uselessness to Socialism of the Second International.

The Socialist Party and the Second International pt.2

    Last month we described the early attitude of the Socialist Party of Great Britain to the Second International when we saw ourselves as part of the intransigent wing of international social democracy.

Socialism and the anti-war campaign

In our report of the International Congress at Copenhagen we referred briefly to the absurd proposals to organise the workers of the world to ensure “universal disarmament and the prevention of warfare”. But in view of the efforts of the British section of the confusionists to “enlighten” the workers on “the all important question of armaments or no armaments, warfare or no warfare” (under capitalism!) and particularly in view of the projected Mass Meeting at the Albert Hall, it is necessary to explain the Socialist position on this matter at greater length.

Confusion in Conference: so-called Socialists meet at Copenhagen

Confusion was the keynote of the proceedings at the International Socialist( (!) Congress held recently at Copenhagen. A Babel of tongues spoke every language but that of Socialism. The “impracticable theory” of rallying the workers to fight for emancipation has been deliberately discarded in favour of the “saner and more practical policy” of devising ways and means of begging, coaxing, threatening reforms and palliatives out of the capitalist class. The Red International founded by Marx and Engels for revolution has been so completely prostituted to reform and compromise, that the bulk of the delegates at the Conference, and the “Labour” Press throughout the world, recognised unhesitatingly that the British Section were the “most advanced, the most revolutionary” of all the delegates. What unspeakable tragedy!

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