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Revisionism

The New "Socialist International"

 At Frankfurt on June 30 a new so-called “Socialist International” was born. It represents the Labour or Social Democratic parties of the world, similar in outlook to the British Labour Party. The fact that some of them bear the name “Socialist” and have given this name to their International has of course no significance as an indication of their aims, they are all of them social reform bodies built up on the belief that the problems of society can be solved through Labour Government administering reformed, planned and nationalised capitalism. The organisation claims 34 affiliated parties with 10 million members but it is far from being world-embracing. It is strongest in Western Europe and the British Dominions, and weakest in North and South America and the Far East.

Editorial: Socialist Unity

 One of the most important questions raised at the International Socialist Congress at Amsterdam was that of Socialist Unity. This is by no means the first time that consideration has been given to this subject. It has often been felt by many of those who have taken part in Socialist propaganda and Socialist organisation that much harm was done by the existence in this and other countries of rival Socialist organisations. And those who have thus felt have been anxious to find some means of unifying the Socialist parties in each country. The International Congress has on the present occasion contented itself with passing a pious resolution recommending the various groups in any country to use their best endeavours to secure this end.

Book Review: 'The Correspondence of Marx and Engels'

'The Correspondence of Marx and Engels'. pp. 534. (Martin Lawrence, Ltd., 12s. 6d.)

The above letters, dating from 1846 to 1895, and numbering over two hundred, cover a wide range of subjects, topical as well as theoretical.

Industrial developments in various countries, and political movements arising therefrom, coupled with conflicting economic theories and philosophical methods are all brought under review. It is, of course, out of the question that such a collection should make smooth, connected reading or that all parts should be of equal value. Some of the letters are of outstanding merit and well worthy of preservation. An almost equal number are of only historical interest as illustrating the development of their immature ideas and the points on which they erred even later in life.

Book Review: 'The Correspondence of Marx and Engels'

'The Correspondence of Marx and Engels'. pp. 534. (Martin Lawrence, Ltd., 12s. 6d.)

The above letters, dating from 1846 to 1895, and numbering over two hundred, cover a wide range of subjects, topical as well as theoretical.

Industrial developments in various countries, and political movements arising therefrom, coupled with conflicting economic theories and philosophical methods are all brought under review. It is, of course, out of the question that such a collection should make smooth, connected reading or that all parts should be of equal value. Some of the letters are of outstanding merit and well worthy of preservation. An almost equal number are of only historical interest as illustrating the development of their immature ideas and the points on which they erred even later in life.

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