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Ramsey MacDonald

Marxism and the Labour Party: Dr. Eismann Replies

In the December issue, under the heading Marx and Hitler, we criticised an article by one of Hitler's supporters, Dr. Eismann, in which he had claimed that the British Labour Party is a Marxist organisation.

Writing in Beamten Jahrbuch (Berlin, January), Dr. Eismann replies to our criticism. He quotes a fairly lengthy passage from our article, but omits the last paragraph. By doing this he is able to argue that, reading between the lines of our article, he can find an admission on our part that the I.L.P., the S.L.P., and the S.D.F. have influenced the Labour Party towards Marxism.

Let us, therefore, reproduce the paragraph he omits to quote : —

“If he knows anything about Marxism, he must know that the Labour Party is no more a Marxist party than the National Government Party, now led by McDonald, the former leader of the Labour Party.”

Labour Government or Socialism?

Foreword

This pamphlet tells you what socialists think of Labour government - not only the Wilson government which entered office in 1964 but all Labour governments past, present and future.

Date: 
1968

The Osborne Judgment: Why Socialists do not demand its reversal

Chopping and Changing
Mr. Ramsay MacDonald tells us that the reversal of the Osborne Judgment is to have first and last place in the Labour Party “platform” at the imminent electoral contests. In the by-election at Walthamstow the question is kept well to the front by the labourites, while the party, after its characteristic humbugging manner, has begun a campaign with the object of reawakening working-class and other interest, of raising funds, and advancing of its new programme – its precious “Right to Work” Bill meanwhile taking a back seat.

On the other hand we find a great many workers – and trade unionists to boot – following the lead of the Daily Express and its kind, who protest that they “wouldn’t mind supporting a genuine Labour party but we are not going to pay for Socialists in Parliament”. All this topsy-turvydom is very pitiful, but more provocative of curses than of mirth.

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