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A. J. Cook

Book Review: Portrait of the Labour Party

Portrait of the Labour Party by Egon Wertheimer (G. P. Putnam. 5s. 214 pages.)
 
This book is written by a German journalist who resided in London for six years as correspondent for two German Social Democratic newspapers.
 
The impressions received and the opinions formed of the Labour Party by the author are alternately flattering, candid, and refreshingly simple.
 
His facts are clouded by romanticism.

The 61st Trades Union Congress


Ben Tillett's Day Out

 The 1929 Annual Congress of the T.U.C. was held this year at Belfast under the chairmanship of Mr. Ben Tillett, M.P.

 What decided the choice of Belfast, we do not know. That Belfast is far enough away to preclude the embarrassing presence of embittered workers from the mining and cotton districts is fairly certain. Windy platitudes, therefore, had free play.

 Mr. Tillett’s presidential address was received by the Press with more than the usual flattery that is doled out to the trade union and Labour leader.

Book Review: The Problem of Problems

 "Problems of the Labour Movement” by P. Braun, price 2d.—The Labour Monthly, 162, Buckingham Palace Road, S.W.

 Problems of the Labour Movement. What an imposing title for a booklet. And what an imposition upon the person who parts with his “tuppence” under the impression that he will learn something about the problems. For, throughout the 16 pages of this booklet, which includes a preface by Mr. A. J. Cook, of the Miners’ Federation, the problems confronting the workers are not even stated.

 To tell us that there are eleven hundred trade unions in England, and to lament the disorganised state of the workers, both nationally and internationally, is not very helpful.

 Unity, Unity, Unity, is the keynote of Mr. Braun’s attempt at outlining a policy for working class action. But one is compelled to exclaim, Words, Words, Words.

The Strike

The largest battle in English industrial history is over and the wounded are being carried off the field.

The first point that strikes one, after making the necessary allowance for the intimidation of the nervous, is the amazing solidarity of the workers on this occasion. The consciousness, dim though it may have been in the main, that they must make common cause and stand together, though only one section was being immediately attacked.

The next point was the demonstration of where the power really lies in modern affairs. The control of the governmental machinery gave the masters the key to the situation.

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