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German Social Democratic Party

"The Mixture as Before"

 German Social Democracy Today

 We are in receipt of the “Action Programme” of the Social Democratic Party of Germany, adopted at the Party Conference at Dortmund in 1952, and revised by the Party Conference at Berlin in July, 1954.

If the date had not been appended to the title page nobody outside would have known.

The Social Democratic Party of Germany has not changed.

 It remains what it was, a nationalistic capitalist outfit, peddling a typically Labourite programme of reforms, while professing to be Socialist.

 Indeed, without the vague introductory references to Socialism in the foreword to the programme, it would hardly differ from its opponents at all.

 Those with knowledge of the facts will read with amusement that

      “The Social-Democratic Party of Germany commits itself more definitely than ever to file great ideas of Socialism and Democracy."—(p. 7).

The Workers' Internationals

 Much has been written on the "lessons" to be learned from the efforts to set up an international organisation that would co-ordinate the national straggles of the workers against capitalism.

 The first experiment arose out of a visit of Parisian workers to the London International Exhibition of 1862. when during the visitors' reception the London trades union officials, Odger and Applegarth, proposed that international congresses of workers be regularly held.

Book Review: Portrait of the Labour Party

Portrait of the Labour Party by Egon Wertheimer (G. P. Putnam. 5s. 214 pages.)
 
This book is written by a German journalist who resided in London for six years as correspondent for two German Social Democratic newspapers.
 
The impressions received and the opinions formed of the Labour Party by the author are alternately flattering, candid, and refreshingly simple.
 
His facts are clouded by romanticism.

Letters: A Letter from a Former Communist

[We have received the following letter from a former Communist. It is particularly interesting, as the writer took an active part, in the Manchester area, in the work of the Communist Party. While we may not see eye-to-eye with the writer on every point, his letter merits serious attention, as an example of the outlook to which years of wholehearted support of the Communist Party has brought one of its adherents.—ED. COMM.]

Stockport.
      February 20th, 1935.

The Editorial Committee,
              THE SOCIALIST STANDARD.
Dear Comrades,

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