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How to proceed?

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ALB
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How to proceed?

Have those interested any suggestions? So far the only one is to proceed section by section.

Père Duchêne
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Joined: 28/11/2013

Are we going to read the different prefaces ?

Section by section seems a rational thing to do.

Chapter 1 'Bourgeois and Proletarians' - Week commencing Monday 14 April ?

DJP
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The prefaces are too important to ignore, though perhaps they should be read after the main chapters.

Père Duchêne
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I agree re: prefaces

So how does an on-line reading group work? We read a section and post comments/questions ?

DJP
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Père Duchêne wrote:

I agree re: prefaces

So how does an on-line reading group work? We read a section and post comments/questions ?

Yes that's pretty much it. You're suggested timetable seems good to me.

ALB
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Père Duchêne wrote:

Section by section seems a rational thing to do.

Chapter 1 'Bourgeois and Proletarians' - Week commencing Monday 14 April ?

I'd suggest rather the week after, i.e after Easter, to give some who have expressed an interest but who are not on this forum the time to do so.

Anyway, I'll creating a separate thread for each section, so that they are ready for whenever we want to use them.

Vin
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Does  'section 1' include the'preamble' ?

A spectre is haunting Europe........

ALB
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I see what you mean. The 3 or 4 paragraphs before section 1. I suppose we could discuss whether or not it was so in 1848 that communism was a sepectre haunting Europe. I suspect not but that the spectre was rather political democracy (ie universal male suffrage electing a law-making body that controlled the executive in place of the various authoritarian dynastic regimes). There, I've jumped the gun and already started discussing when I shouldn't have done.

Vin
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 Was he applying his own historical materialism to the material conditions he found at hand?  Clearly communism was not possible at the time so  would that make Marx a Utopian?.cheeky

 

 

ALB
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Actually, in the Communist Manifesto Marx acknowledged that at the time a bourgeois revolution would have to proceed any communist (or socialist) revolution. His mistake was to assume that, in 1848+, this would be followed fairly rapidly by a 'proletarian revolution' in which the working class would gain control of political power even if they wouldn't be able to bring in communism immediately. But can we blame blokes in their 20s for being over-optimistic?

I hope others are following this premature discussion and will join in now that the ball is in play.

Brian
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Joined: 08/11/2011

Please read on to where Marx describes "...... ..... this nursery tale of the Spectre of Communism with a Manifesto of the party itself."  The use of the term "nursery tale" is clearly a rebuttal to the capitalist  branding all opposition as communistic besides cleverly inferring that they lack political sophistication and are immature in recognising and identifying their real enemy whose time has come.

In short, the whole of the manifesto sets out to put the historical record straight.

Yours For Positive Socialist Activity

Brian

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