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Corbyn's Conference speech

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ALB
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Corbyn's Conference speech

The media are reporting that Corbyn told the Labour Party Conference yesterday that capitalism is in crisis. Actually, according to the transcript of his speech, this is not what he said. He was quoting the Financial Times as having said that capitalism was suffering a "crisis of legitimation" -- which it is and, of course, where we come in.

Although Corbyn used the word "socialist" three times in his speech he didn't (thankfully) say what he was advocating was socialism. In fact, he was advocating a reformed capitalism, as today's Times has picked up:

Quote:
The Labour leader told his party's conference in Brighton yesterday that capitralism faced a "crisis of legitimacy". He added that it was "time we developed a new model to replace the failed dogma of neo-liberalism". Labour aides could not say whether Mr Corbyn's new economic model would be capitalist, hinting only that a majority of assets would be privately owned.
Exactly, so it will still be capitalism, not even state capitalism.

Vin
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ALB wrote:

 so it will still be capitalism, not even state capitalism.

Well, yes it is. But then capitalism with a united working class organised in trade unions is still capitalism. I notice you didn't reply to my post on socialist attitudes to Corbyn's reforms  in relation to worker rights? We will be asked about thisdevil

Young Master Smeet
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http://www.itv.com/news/2017-09-26/jeremy-corbyn-labour-conference-pound-brexit/

Quote:
Asked if he was worried about the possibility of a run on the pound, Mr Corbyn said it was an "historical problem" and investors should not fear his plans.

He said: "We are going to raise taxation, corporate taxation, they know that. We're going to invest in our economy and we do want a mixed economy.

"Does it mean everything is going to be taken to public ownership? No. Does it mean we want you to be investing here, in industries? Yes, we do."

Mr Corbyn added: "We will invest, we will develop and this is our economic offer and our economic model. We'll be a stronger society, a more equal society and a much more productive society."

Pressed on joining the EEA, Mr Corbyn said: "We will do the job we've said we would, which is a tariff-free trade relationship with Europe."

ALB
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Vin wrote:
Should socialists support the Labour Party's proposed reforms on "Rights at Work" proposed in it's 2017 manifesto?
Depends on what you mean by "support". Certainly the Party can't support them in the sense of advocating them. Maybe a minority of Socialist MPs could be instructed to vote for them. A socialist in a trade union could well support them through their trade union and as a trade unionist. What they couldn't do is to vote Labour or tell others to vote Labour to try to get them.

The situation here reminds me of that in France in 1980 in the run-up to François Mitterand's election as President in 1981. The Labour Party is making the same sort of promises about changing the way capitalism works as his party made during that period. When he was elected there was dancing in the streets. But things soon turned sour. For those who can read French what's happened is documented here:

https://www.worldsocialism.org/canada/frechec.htm

Basically, when the "Socialist" Party/"Communist" Party government came to power in June 1981 they increased benefits, nationalised the banks, etc but within a few months were forced to backtrack and ended up imposing austerity and devaluing the franc three times. A bit like the Wilson 1964-70 Labour government in Britain.

We know that this is what would happen to a Corbyn Labour government, so there's no point in encouraging illusions about what reforms it might be able to deliver.

Vin
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ALB wrote:

We know that this is what would happen to a Corbyn Labour government, so there's no point in encouraging illusions about what reforms it might be able to deliver.

 

That isn't my point. Labour is proposing TU rights including the repeal of Tory anti union laws.  I am not talking about supporting reformism. 

gnome
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Vin wrote:

ALB wrote:

We know that this is what would happen to a Corbyn Labour government, so there's no point in encouraging illusions about what reforms it might be able to deliver.

That isn't my point. Labour is proposing TU rights including the repeal of Tory anti union laws.  I am not talking about supporting reformism. 

What should be universally recognised by now is that capitalist parties put forward all manner of proposals and make all kind of promises when in opposition to make themselves more electable, most of which never get implemented once in power.  And any measure that might be of benefit to the working class can always be withdrawn at a later date if circumstances demand.

Mike Foster
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The content of Corbyn's speech may not be anything new to politics, although of course it sounded new to younger voters who weren't around in the 80s or before. What is new here is the personality cult he has attracted, typified by the 'Oh Jeremy Corbyn' chant (to the tune of a White Stripes song, is it?). There was even a portrait of Corbyn with a tinsel halo being brandished by one of the conference attendees. This adulation is similar to that which you get in America, especially towards Trump (among Republicans, anyway). Both Trump and Corbyn come across to their disciples as mavericks challenging existing methods with 'common sense'. Hero worship leads people to believe that their leader can achieve anything, regardless of the practicalities.

jondwhite
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Vin wrote:

ALB wrote:

We know that this is what would happen to a Corbyn Labour government, so there's no point in encouraging illusions about what reforms it might be able to deliver.

 

That isn't my point. Labour is proposing TU rights including the repeal of Tory anti union laws.  I am not talking about supporting reformism. 

Well it's not exactly strong trade unions forcing his hand. What might be given with one hand, can be taken away with the other. So what will the bargain be? Stagnating or falling wages? Welfare cuts? Offshoring manufacturing jobs? More crumbs are better than less, but it isn't even clear this will be more crumbs, let alone anything to do with the basis the SPGB are seeking support on from the working-class.

Matt
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The trade unions have been more concerned with protecting their assets than propagating the class struggle. There is a point where they need to protect the pensions and so on, of their officials but I am with Scargill in his rejoinder to them, during Thatcher's era, "it's sequestration and not castration."

"From each according to their ability, to each according to their needs".

ALB
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Mike Foster wrote:
What is new here is the personality cult he has attracted, typified by the 'Oh Jeremy Corbyn' chant (to the tune of a White Stripes song, is it?).
Our branch worked out in the pub after one of our meetings that "Ohh Soch-al-ist Party" can be sung to the same tune if anyone wants to prepare a chorus for our coming delegate meeting.

Tim Kilgallon
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or even "Oh Rafa Benitez"


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